Clarinet Tone Talk: Buffet R13 versus Tosca – Brahms Sonata excerpts

Samples 1 and 2are the first phrase from Brahms Sonata Opus 120 #1.

Samples 3 and 4 are form Opus 120 #2. Let me know what you think.

1-

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2-

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3-

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4-

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The players from last week's Rossini Tone Talk sample are 1- Sabina Meyer and 2- Martin Frost.

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8 comments for “Clarinet Tone Talk: Buffet R13 versus Tosca – Brahms Sonata excerpts

  1. Michael N
    January 13, 2011 at

    #2 and #4 are the better two for me. I hear a more complex sound with slightly greater resistance. My guess is that these two are the Toscas 🙂

  2. January 12, 2011 at

    I hope 1 and 3 are the R13. Thats a horn I could afford!! K

  3. January 10, 2011 at

    Sabine Meyer and Martin Fröst 🙂

    Funny, I am pretty familiar with both clarinetists and listen to their recordings quite a bit. I had figured #1 was Meyer but did not guess #2 was Fröst … even though I think of Fröst as having a sound that’s fairly distinct from the German clarinetists (although he has somewhat different tones in different recordings I have of him). While most of the time I like Meyer’s sound better, Fröst sounds really good in the Brahms sonatas and the Mozart quintet.

  4. January 10, 2011 at

    In reply to all, you hear what I hear.

    John Peacock, I am not surprised you liked 1 better. It is a more open sound for sure, something you like. As I said, I may be heading further away from your ideal as I seek to zone in on mine.

    D

  5. John Peacock
    January 10, 2011 at

    Hmm. I like 1 better than 2, but 4 better than 3. I listened several times, but 2 and 3 seem to share a characteristic, which is that the tone on occasions gathers an edge and a feeling of approaching limits. 1 and 4 sound more homogeneous and less restricted (although the 1/2 difference was larger than 3/4)

    I wouldn’t care to guess which is the R13 and which the Tosca. I’ve tried Toscas and didn’t like them: rather free-blowing but the lack of resistance made for a rather thin sound in my case. You said in a recent post you had to pay $$$ for a small improvement, but price is no guarantee. I was lucky enough to get a 1959 R13 off eBay recently for about 1/6 the price of a Tosca, but works better for me than any modern Buffet.

  6. Bob
    January 10, 2011 at

    Agree completely. There is a striking difference in the ability of #2 and #4 to handle the leaps with smoothness and continuity of the line. It sounds like #1 and #3 is much more of a struggle to connect. Tone quality is similar, but when you consider the smoothness of the line, I prefer #2/#4.

  7. January 10, 2011 at

    I agree. #2 and 4 sound freer and more uniform and less resistive.
    Well, I identified the Frost recording, so I will go out on a limb again and say that the 2 I selected here are the R13s.

  8. Ed
    January 10, 2011 at

    2 and 4 sound as if they are more comfortable to play or perhaps the set up suits it a bit better. The intervals and musical lines are considerably smoother. There also seems to be a bit more uniform tone quality and intonation.

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