Physiology of ensemble playing revealed…by a violin-playing skeleton – Classical Music UK

Physiology of ensemble playing revealed...by a violin-playing skeleton - Classical Music UK.

Well Duh! (Here's the link to the skeleton playing. I hope he/it has a good chiropractor.)

"They found that the most useful tempo information was in the head and the right arm of the first violinist, and that the tempo was dictated by the 'energy' of her upbeat (its peak acceleration)."

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2 comments for “Physiology of ensemble playing revealed…by a violin-playing skeleton – Classical Music UK

  1. June 9, 2010 at

    What a bunch of absolute geniuses … or perhaps they are merely masters at stating the obvious. Here's another way of looking at it from the perspective of non-string players: in a wind ensemble, say a wind quintet (flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, and French Horn – which is not French, but I digress) the instrument that leads off in any particular section (say the clarinet) would use their instrument – in the case of the clarinet, almost like a conductor's baton, but with rounder gestures as the mouthpiece remains in the mouth. Flautists regularly make 'round' gestures with their instruments to indicate tempo changes, or, in small ensemble work, to mark the end of a section or piece (I've played with many flautists in classical guitar and flute duets and we were always able to 'stay together' without 'counting out loud').

    • June 10, 2010 at

      Indeed. They could have just asked us! We know how we stay together; a lot of practice, playing together a long time, and feeling the music together.

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