Met avoids repeat train wreck by switching conductors for season’s second ‘Traviata’

Met avoids repeat train wreck by switching conductors for season’s second ‘Traviata’.

How embarrassing!

Gone was Leonard Slatkin, who presided over Monday night’s season premiere of the Verdi opera with a striking lack of coordination between the orchestra and singers. In his place Saturday night was Met mainstay Marco Armiliato — only four hours after he had led a matinee performance of another Verdi work, “Aida.”

I've never heard of this happening; a conductor simply removed and replaced. Leonard Slatkin was originally hired to conduct Corigliano's "Ghosts of Versailles". But when the Met decided it was too expensive to produce, they substituted "Traviata".

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6 comments for “Met avoids repeat train wreck by switching conductors for season’s second ‘Traviata’

  1. JMAverett
    April 7, 2010 at

    Did you get this from the NY Times?

  2. Janet Averett
    April 7, 2010 at

    Geez, it isn't even that hard to conduct! We did it here once with a local wealthy doctor who paid to conduct it, even though he couldn't really conduct. He did it from memory with a few small problems but we all held it together. Who doesn't know Traviata?'

    • April 7, 2010 at

      Good point Janet. Haven't we all sung major parts of it in the shower? (Please don't tell anyone! :-))

  3. April 6, 2010 at

    David,

    I had some friends tell me that it wasn't a very easy performance to follow, and he was joking a bit about not knowing the score. A few years ago my friend told me the crowd gave Domingo some grief when he was conducting, but being taken off an opera, very strange.

    Justin

    • April 6, 2010 at

      Hi Justin. Interesting. I doubt he is too worried about it at his stage of career.

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