A new world of music where anything is possible

A new world of music where anything is possible.

It sounds like new music is beating to a new rhythm, outside the drum (box). Here's an excerpt. Note the last sentence. Now there's a conversation starter!

New classical music is in a period of unpredictability. For much of the 20th century there was the ''right'' sort of music to compose, especially within the classical world. If a composer wanted to write a new string quartet, for example, it needed to be of a certain musical language to be taken seriously by the musical establishment.

The exciting thing about new music at the opening of the 21st century is that the barriers to music creation are breaking down. This is having a significant effect on the types of music that composers from all over the world are creating.

For a start, there are more composers writing music now than at any time in history. Numerically speaking, most of the world's composers are songwriters or electronic musicians, using the incredible growth in technology to record and disseminate their material. They need not know music theory or even how to play an instrument, as computers can facilitate incredible sound worlds in much less time than it takes to learn the clarinet.

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3 comments for “A new world of music where anything is possible

  1. May 5, 2010 at

    This is a really interesting post to me because I've taken an interest in combining my clarinet performance with electronic music. Mostly I've been working in Ableton Live (with some Max/MSP programming) which is a nice platform for performance. While I'd agree that in theory you could put together some interesting things fairly quickly, there's a significant challenge to really learning the software. A clarinet offers limited possibilities, a certain range, various timbres, and other limits on its function. If you want other functions, you need to pick up an oboe, or tuba, or something. But with technology, there's so much choice (and those choices change so quickly) that imposing limits becomes an important aspect of expression. Doing that skillfully I think takes at least as much time as learning to play the clarinet.

  2. May 5, 2010 at

    This is a really interesting post to me because I've taken an interest in combining my clarinet performance with electronic music. Mostly I've been working in Ableton Live (with some Max/MSP programming) which is a nice platform for performance. While I'd agree that in theory you could put together some interesting things fairly quickly, there's a significant challenge to really learning the software. A clarinet offers limited possibilities, a certain range, various timbres, and other limits on its function. If you want other functions, you need to pick up an oboe, or tuba, or something. But with technology, there's so much choice (and those choices change so quickly) that imposing limits becomes an important aspect of expression. Doing that skillfully I think takes at least as much time as learning to play the clarinet.

    • May 5, 2010 at

      Hey Adam. Lots of good ideas in what you say. I think that a performance will always be as good as the player. Electronic additions are not necessarily better or more interesting, unless they are inspired and effective. Electronic additions to performance do, however, allow more freedom and options for expression.

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